CDC Study: Loneliness, Not Solitude, Drives Depression

CDC Study: Loneliness, Not Solitude, Drives Depression

The CDCs National Health Statistics Report reveals that adults living alone are more prone to reporting feelings of depression compared to those living with others.

The CDCs National Health Statistics Report reveals that adults living alone are more prone to reporting feelings of depression compared to those living with others.

The report highlights the vital role of social and emotional support and underscores that individuals lacking such support are more prone to depression. Among those living alone, 1 in 16 reports depression, while the ratio is one in twenty-five among cohabitants.

Moreover, individuals living alone without sufficient support are significantly more susceptible to depression. Conversely, when adequately supported, theres no notable difference in depression levels between individuals living alone and those with company.

This underscores the importance of social and emotional support in mitigating depression, irrespective of living arrangements. Loneliness and social isolation, acknowledged as significant emotional challenges, are closely associated with anxiety and depression.

The reports emphasis on support aligns with existing evidence, highlighting its pivotal role in overall health and well-being. Many households comprise single occupants, with nearly 38 million people in the US living alone. Among them, about 16% of all adults and almost 40% aged 65 or older live independently.

Geographically, regions with the highest prevalence of one-person households are concentrated in the Midwest, Alabama, and Mississippi. Furthermore, older adults living independently are more prevalent in rural counties than in urban areas. Importantly, individuals living alone and receiving little or no support are most likely to report depression.

The report also sheds light on broader societal issues of loneliness and social isolation, recognized as significant contributors to anxiety and depression. Intriguingly, living alone may paradoxically indicate better health, signifying an individuals capability for independent living. Conversely, those in poorer health may be at a heightened risk of experiencing loneliness and depression.

(Source:https://www.deseret.com/2024/2/16/24074894/loneliness-fuels-depression-cdc-study-suggests-emotional-social-support)

Related Stories

No stories found.
logo
South Check
southcheck.in